Friday, 23 September 2011

Holiday Beauty Do's and Don'ts

Why is it that whenever you go to a holiday party, you can always find someone who doesn't look how you would expect? Is it because you think they overdid their fashion or make-up, or is it a touch of envy?
Beauty queen or fashion disaster, it's up to you. If you want to shine for the holidays, take note of these do's and don'ts to spruce up your look and receive raves from your friends and family.
Beauty Do's
Do Experiment.
Check out the latest in make-up and fashion trends and give them a try. This will update your look and chances are, you'll find something that enhances your skin tone and flatters your figure.
Do accentuate your finer features.
Play up your best features while drawing attention away from your problem areas. For example, do you have sleek shoulders but think your hips are too wide? Wear a sexy off-the-shoulder dress to show off your finer assets.
Do consult professionals.
If you're the do-it-yourself kind of gal, you can benefit from professional opinions now & then. Why not get a makeover for the holidays? Keep in mind, salons are booked tightly for the holiday season, so call well in advance for your appointment and use your time in the waiting room looking through magazines for updated hairstyles and fashion that best suit you.
Do simplify your beauty routine.
Unless you're headed out to a holiday party, forgo unnecessary extras that take up valuable time. Keep your hairstyle simple and make-up to natural colors that will look good with anything you wear.
Beauty Don'ts
Don't be afraid of change.
Dazzle your friends with a new look. Whether it's a new hairstyle, hair color, or just a dress, you'll get attention! Think of it this way, models look different for every shoot and are very versatile. Don't they always look great?
Don't wear too much make-up.
There's a fine line between a little extra holiday pizzazz or downright heavy makeup. Choose colors that compliment your face and blend it in well. Double check your face in bright lights before heading out the door.
Don't forget accessories.
Add the finishing touch to your overall appearance. The holidays are festive, so glam it up with accessories and jewelry. Splurge on that handbag you've been wanting and don't feel the least big guilty.
Don't let stress get the better of you.
It's no secret that the holidays can be most stressful time of the year. Use your time wisely and learn to say "no." Your face can easily reveal stress and lack of sleep, so designate some of your duties to family members and be sure to get your beauty rest.

Lorene Radenz is a freelance writer and the founder of http://www.beautytipsonline.com - Your All-In-One Beauty Guide.

The Beauty and Meaning of Birthstones

Birthstones have been around since ancient times, and in those days were believed to possess some magical force that could protect the owner or wearer of the stone. These birthstones were traditionally linked to the Zodiac.

However, modern birthstones are linked to calendar months, and each month has its own unique birthstone, with its own fabled properties. Many people love to wear jewellery set with their birthstone, as the ancient meanings and associations with these stones still intrigue them.

You can get many types of jewellery containing birthstones, such as birthstone rings, a birthstone pendant and birthstone earrings. Giving someone an item of jewellery set with their birthstone is a touching and wonderful gift, and whether you give them a birthstone ring, a birthstone pendant or a birthstone brooch, it is something that they are likely to treasure forever because it has real meaning and significance.

Below you will find a listing of each of the birthstones used today.


The birthstone for this month is the garnet, which was once thought to be connected with the blood. This stone is supposed to protect the wearer from nightmares and offer guidance through the dark.

Garnets are long lasting and durable gems, with a fiery, ravishing beauty. This is type of gem that the wearer will treasure forever, no matter what item of jewellery it is set into. Garnets are traditionally thought of as deep red, but actually come in a wide range of colours, so there is something to suit every taste for this month.


The birthstone for this month is the amethyst, and the folklore attached to this gem associates it with sobriety, tranquillity, protection and peace. This birthstone as also been linked to improving the skin and preventing baldness, as well as protection from deceit, so it has a lot to live up to!

The amethyst birthstone comes in varying shades of purple, and can be a pale lilac in colour. On the other end of the scale, you can also get deep violet amethysts, which means that you can enjoy a birthstone that is as subtle or as rich as you like. This birthstone is very hardwearing, and its strength and durability will ensure that it lasts for a very long time.


This month's birthstone is aquamarine, which has been linked to the making of new friends as well as affection and love, hope and health. This stone was once also thought to protect those at sea.

As the name of this birthstone suggests, it is a green-blue in colour and has a rich, sparkling look. You can get aquamarine birthstones in a variety of shapes and sizes, and you can also get this stone in varying shades of green-blue.


One of the most popular gems throughout history, diamonds are the birthstone for this month, and these stones are linked to love, eternity and strength. This has contributed towards diamonds being the most popular gems of all time when it comes to romance, such as engagement rings and wedding bands.

Diamonds are very strong and hardwearing, making them the perfect birthstone to wear on a daily basis. You can enjoy many different cuts of this stone, and the fiery, glamorous sparkle given off by diamonds is positively captivating.


This month's birthstone is the beautiful emerald, once linked to health and the curing of ailments, as well as being associated with the ability to see in to the future, giving them an almost bewitching, magical reputation.

These fiery green gems are amazing to look at, and can be found in a variety of shapes and cuts. The beauty and richness of this stone makes it the perfect gem for birthstone jewellery, and is something that the wearer can show off and take pride in for a long time.


The elegant pearl is the birthstone for the month of June, and this gem has been linked with chastity and modesty, making it something of an angelic, pure birthstone. They are also linked to successful and happy marriages.

These round, stunning birthstones come in a variety of colours, and a range of sizes. Pearls can look spectacular yet modest in all manner of jewellery from birthstone rings, to earrings and necklaces, making them a perfect gift.


The birthstone for this month is the ravishing ruby, a stone traditionally linked with protection and harmony. This birthstone has been mined since ancient times, and boasts a spectacular beauty.

Deep red in colour, rubies are stunning birthstones that will liven up and enhance any piece of jewellery. These gems have a unique, vivid and fiery appearance that would delight anyone.


The birthstone for the month of August is peridot, which was commonly linked with protection against evil and night terrors, as well as a gem that enhanced the properties of healing drugs.

Lime green in colour, this birthstone is a by-product of volcanic action, and comes in all sorts of shapes and sizes. This birthstone gives off its own unique energy, and is strong and durable.


Sumptuous sapphire is the birthstone associated with September, and this gem has been linked with faith and purity, as well as foresight. It was thought that the stronger the sparkle of the gem, the more faithful and honest the wearer.

These birthstones look stunning in all types of jewellery, especially in white gold and platinum metal. However, sapphires can come in other colours as well as blue. These are strong and durable gems that will last for years to come, and can be passed down to future generations.


The birthstone of October is the opal, a stone that has been linked to purity, hope and innocence. This gem has also been linked to healing forces, friendship and emotion, so it has experienced its fair share of folklore over the years.

This type of birthstone comes in white or black, and both variations have remnants of other colours within them. Opals have a unique look and beauty, making them a very interesting birthstone with a strangely exquisite appearance.


The birthstone for this month is topaz, once linked with sanity, healing, and life, as well as being connected to strength by the ancient Greeks. This stone has even been linked to an ability to make the wearer invisible in dangerous situations.

This birthstone comes in a range of colours, all of which will enhance any jewel with a fiery sparkle. Colours include golden, blue, pale green, pink and red, as well as some other rare colours. A stunning gem, topaz boasts both beauty and strength.


The given birthstone for December is turquoise, and this precious stone was once linked to happiness, fortune and luck, making it a very popular gem in centuries gone by.

Turquoise can range in colour from mid-blue to a green-blue or light green colour, and this birthstone is unusual and beautiful, making it a very distinctive and unusual addition to any jewellery collection.


Giving a birthstone to someone special as a gift means giving so much more than just a piece of jewellery. The ancient meanings associated with each of these birthstones make them extra-special, giving them a quality that is impossible to achieve with any other gem.

Whether you decide to give a birthstone ring, necklace earrings or any other piece of jewellery, you will always find stunning pieces where the precious metal and the birthstone complement one another perfectly. Birthstone jewellery makes a unique, beautiful, and affordable gift with real sentiment behind it.

About the Author
Antigone Arthur is an award-winning author and freelance writer providing consumer information on such topics as birthstones and gemstones, promise rings, and celtic wedding rings.

Make Time For Beauty

In today’s hectic World many of us women have little or no time at all to take care of ourselves. Wouldn’t it be nice to have a couple of hours just for yourself? Or simply have a more put together look? Here are some tips that will allow you to make time for your own beauty routine!
  • Schedule the beauty routine in your weekly schedule beforehand; even if you are going to do it at home.
  • Make it a routine and stick to it, for example: I will do my hair and nails every Thursday night.
  • Do you have dry skin and no time for daily moisturizing? Try buying soap for dry skin.
  • Delegate at least one of your chores to your partner or a family member.
  • Cut off your cooking time, and order out or prepare microwave dinner. You can also cook for two days and take the next day for your beauty routine.
  • If you can afford it pay someone to do a portion of your chores.
  • Have all the necessary items for your beauty routine in one place, to avoid wasting time looking for them.
  • Do not take phone calls during your beauty time.
  • Cut off or limit time wasting habits such as TV.

About The Author

Kenia Morales is the publisher of online magazine http://kpatra.com "For Every Aspect of Today's Woman. Visit her site to find a variety of women related issues and topics" click here http://www.kpatra.com/keniascolumn.htm to find Kenia's little piece of heaven her inspirational column

Seeking Ideal Beauty

There seems to me to be definite parallels between this era, and the Elizabethan Age, when it comes to women, and their desperate struggle to either halt the natural aging of their appearance, or, to discover a miracle age-reversal method. During the sixteenth century, well-born women were obsessed with achieving, and maintaining, 'ideal' beauty, as they perceived it, to the point of what we would call 'madness'. What was this ideal they so longed to possess? Youthful unlined alabaster skin, overly bright eyes, red cheeks and lips, and the fairest of hair colors. Add to these attributes, a high, arched, pale eyebrow, and high brow line. To achieve the 'look' of perfection, these women made use of the period’s highly respected skin care techniques, and the finest cosmetics available to them, at the time.

First, the hairline was plucked back, an inch or more. Next, the eyebrows had to be plucked and arched, and the hair of the head and eyebrows was then bleached out using a variety of the most up-to-date bleaching agents, including urine, and sulfuric acid. Women, who could afford the high cost, purchased the top of the line skin whitener, 'ceruse', a mixture of white lead, and vinegar. This was used on the face, neck, bosom, and often the hands and arms as well. This concoction was used in conjunction with the 'skin firmer' of choice, uncooked egg white. This noxious mess was then spread on the face, neck and bosom, and allowed to dry, to tighten, and hide wrinkles, and give the face a white, unlined, mask-like finish. To imitate a blush and pout of youthful beauty, vermilion (mercuric sulfide) was THE choice for lips and cheeks. Faintly traced veins were then added to the skin surface of the bosom, for that 'natural' look. Drops of belladonna were then administered to the eyes, to achieve that desired 'sparkle', and the eyes were outlined in kohl. To care for their complexions, the ladies made use of what was highly touted as the best cleanser. Mercury mixed with alum, and honey. Of course, a common practice was the 'facial peel', and the most widely used, and highly regarded peel agent, was mercury.

These were the commonly accepted 'beauty' practices, of women over four hundred years ago, and yet, how 'in the moment', it all seems! We may not use mercury for chemical peels, but glycolic acid, salicylic acid, or lactic acid; trichloroacetic acid (TCA), or carbolic acid (phenol) - are used. We don't spread raw egg white on our complexions as a temporary skin firmer, but modern women may be surprised to learn, they could very well have used 'skin firmers' containing formaldehyde. We may gasp in horror over sixteenth century women applying poison to their faces; yet, Botox injections seem perfectly mundane, and safe, to us.
What were the long-term results of the use of their miracle beauty and facial products, for the classy Elizabethan lady? Complexions more rapidly aged, gray, shriveled, and mummified.

When I read of young women still in their twenties, opting for ‘beauty treatments’ that require they have their complexions chemically treated, or otherwise ravaged, I am appalled. I can only wonder at the long-term effects of such drastic measures. Mature women, obsessed with seeking some elusive anti-aging/age-reversal miracle, become nothing more than willing test-subjects for any new facial product/procedure that hits the market. Often, they have no idea as to the ingredients in the products they are smearing on their faces. Nor, do they take into consideration future effects of certain procedures. Perhaps, we modern women should consider the lessons of the past, and proceed with caution, and common sense, when choosing our ‘beauty’ regimens.

Author-Jeannine Schenewerk

About the Author
Jeannine Schenewerk is a freelance writer residing in Atlanta, Georgia. Her recent article, 'Self Image and the Mature Woman', has been published on numerous sites. She maintains an informative, inspirational, website, 'In Touch With Jeannine', for mature women.

The Hottest Beauty Trend Isn’t for Women: It’s Skin Care for

Not too long ago, it used to be that when a woman brought home her facial scrub, cleanser and toner, she could be sure that the closest her man got to them was reaching over those fancy jars for his can of shaving cream.
Not any more. In recent years, men have been secretly dipping into their wives and girlfriends skin care products and liking the results that they see. So much so that many companies are developing skincare lines just for men.
And men are flocking to these skin care products in droves. Statistics reveal that men in the United States are spending over $4 billion a year on grooming products.
Skin care for men is growing in popularity among ethnic men as well. Ethnic men spend $88 million on skincare products. There is no sign of this trend slowing down.
One main difference between skin care for men and women is ease of use. While women may be willing to go through several steps in their beauty regimen, men like their regimen to be quick and easy. One, two, three and they’re out the door.
Keeping it simple doesn’t mean skimping on quality. Men are looking for high quality skin care products just like their female counterparts. MaleFace is a good example of high quality men’s skincare.
For more information on male skin care visit: http://www.1-minute-beauty-diva.com/FaceAMansSecret.html

Copyright 2004
Donna Monday writes beauty related articles for http://www.1-minute-beauty-diva.com

Beauty Today: All Smoke and Mirrors?

Did you ever notice that the bar is continually being raised on exactly what physical characteristics define beauty? As I sit in front of the TV, I am bombarded by beauties with pouty lips, perfect bone structure, flawless skin, more "voluptuous" upper regions, size 2 waists, and hair that resembles spun silk. Take these same beauties and plop them back in time 20-30 years, when the advent of modern cosmetic technology had not even begun to reach its full potential. Do you think they would have had those same attributes you find yourself longing for when faced with these images? My guess is probably not, or at least not to the same extent.
True, genetics play a role in physical beauty, but with the likes of total "extreme" makeover reality TV (The Swan, Extreme Makeover, Dr. Beverly Hills) and abundant publicity, we see that beauty and cosmetic improvement can now be achieved by a few thousand dollars and a good plastic surgeon. Not only that, but cosmetics in general are now so technologically advanced, you can improve your looks by personal makeup application and home treatments.
There are now do-it-yourself cosmetic treatments such as home microdermabrasion kits, chemical peels, "botox" creams and gels, teeth whiteners, hair removal treatments, cellulite treatments, professional hair straighteners and colors, self tanners, lip enlargers, acne treatments, and the list goes on and on (http://www.cosmeticsgalore.com/best-skincare-products-reviews.html ). Cosmetics marketers and science have joined forces to give women everything they ever wanted to be their most beautiful, and feel better about themselves. Women are benefitting by so many companies competing for a piece of these fairly new markets by lower, more competitive prices.
Not only are there new breakthroughs in the world of cosmetic science, but there are constantly new studies and discoveries in the field of nutrition, fitness, and wellness. Combine this with the new wave of technologically advanced cosmetics, supplements, and treatments, and you've got a recipe for a healthier, longer, more satisfying life for those of us who decide to take advantage of the advanced knowledge of our time.
So, does your desire to be your best and most beautiful self make you shallow, less credible, or somehow jeopardize your feminist agendas? Unless you've somehow compromised your integrity, morals, or core beliefs along the way, the answer is ABSOLUTELY NOT! As long as you are not putting yourself at high risk for physical harm, obsessing endlessly, or spending your life savings, investing time and money into your beauty ultimately is an investment in your well being, self esteem, and many times, mental and physical health. Feeling beautiful is part of what makes us women. Come on, it's just plain FUN to experiment with different looks and different products! It feels good to be noticed, and when you feel beautiful, you tend to radiate confidence and power. It is inherent in our nature to want to feel feminine and look and feel our best, and there is nothing wrong with it, as long as it is not all-consuming.
As a self-proclaimed "product junkie", I can attest that many of these newly engineered products really do work, as I have tried nearly all of them in the quest to look and feel my best. I can't wait to see what they'll come out with next, as every new product seems to top the last. Hey, women have come a long way, and we deserve to feel sexy and confident - beyond smoke and mirrors!

Danna Schneider is the webmaster of the beauty review and advice website CosmeticsGalore.com ( http://www.cosmeticsgalore.com ). She is a cosmetics and beauty product researcher and enthusiast.

Lord Byron's "She Walks in Beauty"

Lord Byron’s opening couplet to “She Walks In Beauty” is among the most memorable and most quoted lines in romantic poetry. The opening lines are effortless, graceful, and beautiful, a fitting match for his poem about a woman who possesses effortless grace and beauty.

Life in England

Lord Byron was born George Gordon Noel Byron in London in 1788. He became a Lord in 1798 when he inherited the title and the estate of his great-uncle. Byron’s mother had taken him to Scotland for treatment for his club foot, but she brought him back to England to claim the title and the estate.

Byron was privately tutored in Nottingham for a short period. He then studied in Harrow, Southwell, and Newstead, and finally at Trinity College. Byron discovered a talent for writing poetry and published some early poems in 1806 and his first collection, called Hours of Idleness, in 1897 at the age of 19. When he turned age 21 he was able to take his seat in the House of Lords.

However, Lord Byron left England for two years with his friend, John Hobhouse, to travel through Europe. They toured Spain, Malta, Greece, and Constantinople. Greece especially impressed Byron and would create a recurring theme in his life.

After returning to England Lord Byron made his first speech to the House of Lords. Later that year he published a “poetic travelogue” titled, "Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage," a respectable collection of verses about his recent travels in Europe. The collection earned Lord Byron lasting fame and admiration. Lord Byron had become a ladies’ man and the newly earned celebrity brought him a series of affairs and courtships.

Lord Byron married Anna Isabella Milbanke in 1815 and his daughter, Augusta, was born later that year. However, the marriage did not last long. In early 1816 Anna and Augusta left Lord Byron and later that year he filed for legal separation and left England for Switzerland, a self-imposed exile.

Life in Europe

While in Switzerland Lord Byron stayed with Percy Bysshe Shelley, a prominent metaphysical and romantic poet, and had an illegitimate daughter, Allegra, with Claire Clairmont. After that affair ended, Lord Byron and his friend, John Hobhouse traveled through Italy, settling first in Venice, where he had a couple more affairs, including an affair with the nineteen year old Countess Teresa Guicciolo. Here Lord Byron began his most famous and most acclaimed work, the epic poem "Don Juan."

Lord Byron and Teresa moved to Ravenna, then to Pisa, and then to Leghorn, near Shelley’s house, in 1821. The poet Leigh Hunt moved in with Lord Byron later that year after Shelley drowned off the coast near Leghorn in a storm. Lord Byron contributed poetry to Hunt’s periodical, "The Liberal", until 1823 when he took the opportunity to travel to Greece to act as an agent for the Greeks in their war against Turkey.

Lord Byron used his personal finances to help fund some of the battles by the Greeks against the Turks. He even commanded a force of three thousand men in an attack on the Turkish-held fortress of Lepanto. The siege was unsuccessful and the forces withdrew. At this time Lord Byron suffered one or two epileptic fits. The remedy of the day, blood-letting, weakened him.

Six weeks later, during a particularly chilly rainstorm, Lord Byron contracted a severe cold. The accompanying fever was treated by repeated bleeding by trusted physicians, but his condition worsened until he eventually slipped into a coma and died on April 19, 1924.

Lord Byron was a hero in Greece and was deeply mourned there. His heart was buried in Greece and his body was sent to England where it was buried in the family vault near Newstead. He was denied burial in Westminster Abbey because of the perceived immorality of his life and numerous controversies. Finally in 1969, 145 years after his death, a memorial was placed in the Poets’ Corner of Westminster Abbey, commemorating his poetry and accomplishments.

Shortly after his arrival in Greece, Lord Byron had written these appropriate lines.
"Seek out—less often sought than found—
A soldier's grave—for thee the best
Then look around, and choose thy ground,
And take thy rest."

An interesting and exceptional biography of Lord Byron’s life was written in 1830 by a contemporary and friend, John Galt, titled, "The Life of Lord Byron." The 49 chapters give a good measure of Lord Byron’s complexity.

“She Walks in Beauty”

In June, 1814, several months before he met and married his first wife, Anna Milbanke, Lord Byron attended a party at Lady Sitwell’s. While at the party, Lord Byron was inspired by the sight of his cousin, the beautiful Mrs. Wilmot, who was wearing a black spangled mourning dress. Lord Byron was struck by his cousin’s dark hair and fair face, the mingling of various lights and shades. This became the essence of his poem about her.

According to his friend, James W. Webster, “I did take him to Lady Sitwell’s party in Seymour Road. He there for the first time saw his cousin, the beautiful Mrs. Wilmot. When we returned to his rooms in Albany, he said little, but desired Fletcher to give him a tumbler of brandy, which he drank at one to Mrs. Wilmot’s health, then retired to rest, and was, I heard afterwards, in a sad state all night. The next day he wrote those charming lines upon her—She walks in Beauty like the Night…”

The poem was published in 1815. Also in that year Lord Byron wrote a number of songs to be set to traditional Jewish tunes by Isaac Nathan. Lord Byron included “She Walks in Beauty” with those poems.

She Walks in Beauty

She walks in beauty, like the night
Of cloudless climes and starry skies;
And all that's best of dark and bright
Meet in her aspect and her eyes:
Thus mellow'd to that tender light
Which heaven to gaudy day denies.

One shade the more, one ray the less,
Had half impair'd the nameless grace
Which waves in every raven tress,
Or softly lightens o'er her face;
Where thoughts serenely sweet express
How pure, how dear their dwelling place.

And on that cheek, and o'er that brow,
So soft, so calm, yet eloquent,
The smiles that win, the tints that glow,
But tell of days in goodness spent,
A mind at peace with all below,
A heart whose love is innocent!

Discussion of the Poem

The first couple of lines can be confusing if not read properly. Too often readers stop at the end of the first line where there is no punctuation. This is an enjambed line, meaning that it continues without pause onto the second line. That she walks in beauty like the night may not make sense as night represents darkness. However, as the line continues, the night is a cloudless one with bright stars to create a beautiful mellow glow. The first two lines bring together the opposing qualities of darkness and light that are at play throughout the three verses.

The remaining lines of the first verse employ another set of enjambed lines that tell us that her face and eyes combine all that’s best of dark and bright. No mention is made here or elsewhere in the poem of any other physical features of the lady. The focus of the vision is upon the details of the lady’s face and eyes which reflect the mellowed and tender light. She has a remarkable quality of being able to contain the opposites of dark and bright.

The third and fourth lines are not only enjambed, but the fourth line begins with an irregularity in the meter called a metrical substitution. The fourth line starts with an accented syllable followed by an unaccented one, rather than the iambic meter of the other lines, an unaccented syllable followed by an accented one. The result is that the word “Meet” receives attention, an emphasis. The lady’s unique feature is that opposites “meet” in her in a wonderful way.

The second verse tells us that the glow of the lady’s face is nearly perfect. The shades and rays are in just the right proportion, and because they are, the lady possesses a nameless grace. This conveys the romantic idea that her inner beauty is mirrored by her outer beauty. Her thoughts are serene and sweet. She is pure and dear.

The last verse is split between three lines of physical description and three lines that describe the lady’s moral character. Here soft, calm glow reflects a life of peace and goodness. This is a repetition, an emphasis, of the theme that the lady’s physical beauty is a reflection of her inner beauty.

Lord Byron greatly admired his cousin’s serene qualities on that particular night and he has left us with an inspired poem.

The poem was written shortly before Lord Byron’s marriage to Anna Milbanke and published shortly after the marriage.

About the author:
Garry Gamber is a public school teacher and entrepreneur. He writes articles about real estate, politics, health and nutrition, and internet dating services. He is the owner of http://www.Anchorage-Homes.comand http://www.TheDatingAdvisor.com